opera 6.30 ngage for XL

Oleh roediy32 Pada 16 Februari 2013 - 13:26

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13 Respon untuk "opera 6.30 ngage for XL"

Dilihat sebanyak "114" kali

5 [21 Maret 2013 - 12:40]

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5 [25 Maret 2013 - 14:09]

The new update X2 Football 2010/11 somehow has messed up the game difficulty level.Now even at the expert level it is too easy to always beat the strongest team with unrealistic and fancy scores like 18-2.Since downloading the new update, I have not lost any game anymore.The X2 football game turns out to be just a training game and becomes boring.Also it seems to crash more than before, but the crash situations are not reproducible.It looks to me that a better X2 football game has to combine:1. the nicer stadium graphics of the version 20102. the better AI of the corner and free kicks in the version 20103. the by far better game and goal scenarios of the older version 2009. The game AI was better in the old version. In version 2010, it&#8217;s too easy to let a striker run alone ahead of the adverse defenders to score goals! And we can do it many times in a game.4. the behaviour of the stick controller of the version 2009. The new stick controller of the version 2010 is responsible to the chaotic runs of the players (in version 2010 they run in many situations like drunken ducks)My personal suggestions:.) Increasing the number of teams is not meaningful as long as the individual players are not precisely modeled..) Add a function to show the physical fitness shape of the players that will assist their replacement during the game..) Improve referee decisions to draw red cards too easily best regardsThanh http://pharmasonline.net/ http://www.comparetabsprices.net/

5 [03 April 2013 - 04:08]

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5 [03 April 2013 - 04:08]

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5 [03 April 2013 - 08:38]

Michael you asked: "I have never been able to figure out all the details of how data flows through the Blackberry network, let alone money.If anyone else knows, please post a comment."So here goes...1. Data flows:Remember there are two Blackberry services depending on your type of email;a. Blacberry Enterprise Server (BES) covers users where their organisation has their own email server, i.e. Exchange, Lotus Notes and Novell I think. In this case a BES server is installed into the organisation network and connects to the email server on the LAN side and the Blackberry relay infrastructure across the internet.b. Blackberry Internet Service (BIS) - this is for users of ISP (POP/IMAP) or webmail. Here you create a web account on RIM's infrastructure and then you can enter up to 10 email addresses which the relay servers will fetch for you and push out to your device.In both cases, from the mobile device the data always goes from the mobile carriers data network (CDMA x or GPRS/EDGE) through a dedicated link to RIM's relay servers, in other words all mobile devices are in a Blackberry VPN. The reason for this is that RIM are applying their own proprietary transport layer over the radio network - this is very important and secures the quality of the IP connection and is what makes the Blackberry connection so reliable - radio environments are inherently unreliable for data transmission.Then if you are running a BES server the data will go from the Blackberry relays across the secure internet connection to the BES server to reach your company LAN for email, or out to the web via your company web proxy thereby complying with all existing IT policies.If you are using the BIS service then your email, web traffic etc. goes directly out to the internet from the Blackberry server. I.e. have you noticed if you use the BIS web browser Google recognises you as being from Canada, although this will change as RIM decentralises their infrastructure regionally.2. Money FlowsRIM is doing very nicely out of Blackberry with multiple revenue streams:a. Handsets - and as you noted these are getting much better.b. BES software and licences - every BES user requires a 1 off user license. BES server software has been free for download over the last 12months but only comes with 1 user license, and then requires a fairly expensive upgrade to expand it beyond 15 users.c. Monthly user charge - every active user earns RIM about US$8 per month. So as the number of users increases this monthly stream will be increasing as well - I haven't seen any figures reported lately but I am guessing they are at around 7-10million users globally, and growing fast.So RIM are the only vendor that has a dedicated 'always-on' data pipe out to every active user. This should be very valuable for them to leverage off.And from what I have seen their monthly sales are continuing to increase. By aligning themselves exclusively with the mobile operators as the sales channel and allowing the operators to generate sales of data connections they have secured a lot of loyalty from them. For mobile operators Blackberry is a service that just works well and given its sophistication doesn't require too much resource to sell or support. This is in stark contrast to Windows Mobile or Nokia in the business space.But it will very intersting to see what Blackberry does next. They are trying to move into the pro-sumer/consumer space and their latest device (Curve) does a pretty good job - the camera and media manager are OK. They have been very slow to support GSM's 3G/HSDPA (as they have supported US CDMA EV-DO for a while) and again I presume this is for reliability and battery life reasons. Also they will face a challene in scaling their relay infrastructure as the web traffic volumes increase with improving browser.RIM has come from a very strong engineering background in industrial mobile radio data products and have leveraged that well into mobile email. In think they need to stick to their core maket and be careful not to lose sight of that when going after the consumer side. For example their handsets while becoming more attractive have also become more fragile. I know there is market demand for ruggedised devices in the business market. http://www.pillenformenn.com/ http://www.dealsonedtabs.com/

5 [03 April 2013 - 09:56]

Excellent post.It's ironic that the two main reasons that Nokia is so big today are usability (of the early phones - Apple could not have done better) and device sexiness (interior aerials, the clip on fascias etc). Virtues which appear to have been lost by the wayside, but are always paramount for Apple.Operators still call a lot of the shots and own the customer, but are sitting on dwindling revenues from an increasingly rickety business model. A few times you make the risky assumption that operators would act rationally and sensibly - history suggests otherwise. They could still derail everything, cornered beasts desperate to keep the whole grape so no-one can have a slice of the watermelon.Attrition will definitely be Nokia's strategy for taking on Apple as they could crush them financially, but I suspect Nokia's iterations will be slow and the battle with the operators will take a bigger toll - European phones are basically free, and whilst some people don't mind paying in return for reduced monthly outgoings most people won't do the maths. Many that do are likely to stick with their old phones and negotiate the contract price down, which won't help anyone except the consumers. Annoy the carriers, and risk rapidly losing market share - Nokia are the only manufacturer who could pull it off, but as a comparison Carphone Warehouse reigned supreme as the largest independent phone seller in many European markets and Vodafone dropped them as a retailer; carriers will take big risks to maintain their dominance. They could continue to offer Nokias but refuse to subsidise them competitively, and things could go nasty - Ovi could end up stillborn. Luckily for Nokia, operators don't like iTunes so much either and the iPod touch could screw up Apple's bargaining positions outside the US. The really scary thing here for me is the idea of Nokia trying to iterate the OS/UI faster. The history of S60 - always underpowered, confusing and buggy - does not inspire confidence :) Likewise Apple could easily get exhausted trying to keep up on the phone front. It'll be interesting!As an aside, I would point out that Symbian apps are locked down, because the potential for mischief is huge - but Nokia creates a lot of phones with every Java API, and Nokia leaves them as open as basic security measures could ever allow for developers to use (the US carriers lock them down on subsidised handsets, of course; SE are similarly enlightened, Moto want to screw developers for money, Samsung and LG appear to have no clue). Sensible developers code in Java when at all possible as Symbian is still a tiny %age of the market and has all the headaches... http://www.dealsonedtabs.com/ http://www.pillenformenn.com/

5 [05 April 2013 - 15:05]

Thanks for the comments, folks!Matthew, I like your vision. You're right that this sort of integration requires a system vendor opening up the right APIs and infrastructure. And it needs to be a big vendor, because the developers won't do that level of work unless there's a big market for it.Elia wrote:>>While the laptop is a desktop-alternative today and mobiles are generally smaller and less powerful, there is no reason for me to think that this won't change over time.Sure, if the mobile is functionally exactly the same as the notebook, then the products are replacements for one-another. But two questions:1. When exactly is this total convergence between the mobile and notebook computer supposed to happen? I started at Palm in 1999, and people were predicting that it was about to happen. Now it's 2007, and I don't think we're a lot closer now than we were then, because the notebook is a moving target. The #$*& PC vendors keep adding features.2. If the mobile really is functionally the same as a notebook, why wouldn't the OS on the mobile be your notebook computer OS? In other words, does the mobile take over from PCs, or do PCs just slide down into the mobile space? The PC has more apps, and it's compatible with all the PC files in the world.I think Nokia's chances are a lot better if the two worlds remain distinct.Anonymous wrote:>>I think iPhone (or other device replacing PC and Mobile phone) will have a dock to monitor, keyboard and so on. And will give great desktop experience.We'll see. The fact that the iPhone runs a version of OS X makes that more plausible.But still, when you use that device in mobile mode you'll be doing different things from what you do with it in desktop mode. The design and software needs to be specialized for both usage modes, and it's hard to do that in one device.Marc wrote: >>it's clear that recent comments from Nokia suggest that they see Apple's latest product as a validation of the direction they've been espousing for quite some time. Well, maybe. But if I was at a smartphone company and I was competing with the iPhone, the line I'd use in public is, "We welcome the new entrant and we think they just validate our approach." That sounds diplomatic, and reminds people that you've been around for a long time. But what you really mean when you say that is, "We are intensely pissed off that these latecoming jerks are getting more attention than us, but we realize that if we criticize them it'll just look like sour grapes." http://www.findlifequotesonline.com/ http://www.findinsurrates.com/

5 [12 April 2013 - 13:24]

Thanks for the comments, everybody.mark wrote:>> I believe Apple will not engage Nokia on most battlefields. Undoubtedly not, but Nokia is coming after Apple in its core market. The handset folks all want those high-margin data devices, and Nokia wants to be a computer company.I saw a blog post from someone at Nokia tonight saying that they haven't declared war on Apple. Get real. If you're a giant brand and you create your own music store and music player devices, you're in a war with Apple whether you realize it or not.>>Nokia is not close to the consumer in any space except the European mobile space.I agreed with most of what you wrote, but not that bit. Nokia is very close to the consumer almost everywhere except in the US and Japan.Anonymous wrote:>>Apple is tied into AT&T here in the US; Nokia is not.I agree that Apple has a special relationship with AT&T, but they do also offer a lot of Nokia phones...>>A CDMA/EVDO/WiMax Nokia for this future network would indeed be very interestingI fear they have given up on CDMA. They're going to do WiMax, though.Anonymous wrote:>>The Pearl's media handling is crap - navigate through a list of folders like on a windows box, and its pretty ordinary....But core ability of being able to interact with my work's Exchange server very handy.Yup. Because the Pearl is aimed at a totally different market from the iPhone (despite posturing from RIM to the contrary).Anonymous wrote:>>This one's for people living in the US and not knowing the power/market of Nokia. ;)Thanks. That's a really nice example.I almost feel like I need to write two weblog posts -- one explaining the power of Nokia to Americans, and one explaining the power of Apple to Europeans. But folks here are doing a pretty good job of explaining it.Anonymous wrote:>>j2me is perfect for the type of games you usually see made with flash on the web. I'd argue that it's better than flash lite actually, for games.Good point, but isn't the compatibility story for Java across different phones pretty bad? I've had Java developers tell me that they spend the majority of their development time recoding for different phones.>>has flash based games killed pc games? no.Completely true, but the game usage pattern on mobiles is different from PCs -- people tend to use mobile games in short spurts as time-killers when waiting for the bus, etc. Casual games are perfect for that. I'm not sure there is a huge market for really involving games on mobile phones. Maybe for young adults... http://www.findinsurrates.com/ http://www.comparecheapinsur.com/

5 [12 April 2013 - 13:24]

Thanks for the comments, everybody.mark wrote:>> I believe Apple will not engage Nokia on most battlefields. Undoubtedly not, but Nokia is coming after Apple in its core market. The handset folks all want those high-margin data devices, and Nokia wants to be a computer company.I saw a blog post from someone at Nokia tonight saying that they haven't declared war on Apple. Get real. If you're a giant brand and you create your own music store and music player devices, you're in a war with Apple whether you realize it or not.>>Nokia is not close to the consumer in any space except the European mobile space.I agreed with most of what you wrote, but not that bit. Nokia is very close to the consumer almost everywhere except in the US and Japan.Anonymous wrote:>>Apple is tied into AT&T here in the US; Nokia is not.I agree that Apple has a special relationship with AT&T, but they do also offer a lot of Nokia phones...>>A CDMA/EVDO/WiMax Nokia for this future network would indeed be very interestingI fear they have given up on CDMA. They're going to do WiMax, though.Anonymous wrote:>>The Pearl's media handling is crap - navigate through a list of folders like on a windows box, and its pretty ordinary....But core ability of being able to interact with my work's Exchange server very handy.Yup. Because the Pearl is aimed at a totally different market from the iPhone (despite posturing from RIM to the contrary).Anonymous wrote:>>This one's for people living in the US and not knowing the power/market of Nokia. ;)Thanks. That's a really nice example.I almost feel like I need to write two weblog posts -- one explaining the power of Nokia to Americans, and one explaining the power of Apple to Europeans. But folks here are doing a pretty good job of explaining it.Anonymous wrote:>>j2me is perfect for the type of games you usually see made with flash on the web. I'd argue that it's better than flash lite actually, for games.Good point, but isn't the compatibility story for Java across different phones pretty bad? I've had Java developers tell me that they spend the majority of their development time recoding for different phones.>>has flash based games killed pc games? no.Completely true, but the game usage pattern on mobiles is different from PCs -- people tend to use mobile games in short spurts as time-killers when waiting for the bus, etc. Casual games are perfect for that. I'm not sure there is a huge market for really involving games on mobile phones. Maybe for young adults... http://www.findlifequotesonline.com/ http://www.findinsurrates.com/

5 [15 April 2013 - 14:08]

Hi there, good questions:What I am still wondering is how blackberry seems to be a key to free international data roaming. AT&T and a bunch of operators around the world offer unlimited data plans including international for blackberry users; as far as I know none of them offer anything similar for none blackberry devices.I think they do this because of the high level of compression that Blackberry applies, in the order of 10:1 over the same emails sent to other mobile devices. Most Blackberry email users use less than 5MB per month for all email including attachments, and it is only web browsing or now emailing of photos (with Curve) that is pushing usage levels beyond this. I assume that these roaming deals still have data caps in the fine print.The way that it was described is that if I install any apps that route data through any route other than blackberry I would be charged at the maximum allowed data rate for all transfers. On the other hand it does not matter if its email or anyohter type of data if it passes through BES/BIS its free.This is probably because they will be providing you a bundle price for data that goes via the Blackberry VPN connection (i.e. this is how the billing system will be configured), but not for data that goes via standard internet or directly into Corporate network. They could, but they can be much more confident that the Blackberry data compression will keep usage levels manageable.But Blackberry data usage is about to explode with photo sending (size of Curve JPEG images are up to 0.5MB and cannot be further compressed without losing image quality), GPS, richer web browsers supporting RSS (again Curve), and html email support (BES 5.0?). As I raised in my previous post RIM must be facing some very difficult questions of how to scale their model whereby all data continues to transit via their infrastructure.And I agree with your last paragraph in that Blackberry have a very distinct market and a very robust solution. Taking Michaels model of the 3? basic types of mobile device then Blackberry should be well placed to extend into the consumer side of the messaging/communications device with somthing focused, reliable and a bit cool, but they must be careful not to leave the door open to other even more specialised business devices or go too far and alienate that market. http://www.autoinsuranceoptions4you.com/

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